South

 So the choice is made,

our fate taken in hand,

along with sheet and tiller,

and entrusted to wind and tide.

In a few short weeks, Ryan and I are sailing South down the Intracoastal Waterway and beyond! As you can see, the anticipation has me feeling poetical, excited, and a touch melodramatic. We have a very large amount of preparation still remaining, but “Firefly” is sound and we could leave tomorrow if we wanted…it would just be a bit like camping inside a small wet closet. So the boat work continues, and I’ll fill you in as we go. For the moment, my heartfelt thanks to everyone for following along with us to here, I’ve enjoyed chronicling our misadventures in epoxy, and I very much appreciate the kind words and attention from you fine folks. The adventures are far from over, we’ll be posting updates on the preparations and during our travels. Here’s a summary of the story so far…in nothing resembling chronological order.

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Two by two hands of blue

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Potty Talk: Part Duece

Excuse me hiii. Perhaps you thought that with the launch of “Firefly” we would sail off into the sunset, trailing a stream of itchy fiberglass residue and broken hearts in our wake?

In fact, while we have been out sailing every chance we get, the boatwork continues as well. I’m currently neck deep in wiring diagrams so that we can have lights, music, and some nav-gadgets, but dear reader that is not what we’re here to talk about. The subject at hand is somewhat less technological and somewhat more biological in nature. I wrote about the removal of the previous head installation a little while back. The installation of our new “Nature’s Head” composting toilet was somewhat more involved. Getting the thing to fit inside the confines of the enclosed head turned out to be quite an adventure, we ended up having to remove the door (to be replaced with curtains which my mother is constructing. Thanks Ma!), rip out the base upon which the old toilet sat upon (the throne of the throne if you will), and construct a new base for the new toilet. Got it? The Nature’s Head is quite a bit taller than the old head, so it’s slightly cockeyed to allow one to sit upon it without the corner of the cabintop/deck digging into your back. Imagine trying to sit on a toilet inside a half-wide kitchen pantry cabinet and you’ll get the idea. Anywho, the nice thing about the composting toilet is that it doesn’t need plumbing- dump in some peat moss, crank the handle after using it, and supposedly it naturally composts without any odor. We’ll see. It does however require active ventilation to promote the proper microbial activity, which means installing a vent, which means cutting holes in the boat.

We installed a “solar vent” which is a fan hooked up to a solar panel. The advantage of this is it runs constantly and is independent from the boats (non-existent) electrical system. It’s also fairly nifty.

The biggest pain was hooking up the ventilation hose from the toilet to the vent- about 25 minutes of slowly shaping a plastic flange with a dremel to fit inside the fan housing.

Anywho, after all was said and done, I think it turned out purty good. We’ll let you know if it works. Or maybe not.

“Do Your Worst!” It seems to be saying.