Bacon Sails and the Myth of the Previous Owner

One weekend this past April, Ryan and I drove up to Annapolis for the Spring Sailboat show and to check out Bacon Sails. It is not (unfortunaly) an innovative use of pork, but a purveyor of used nautical bits and pieces, a sort of upscale sailboat junkyard. Uptown appointments with a downtown price, if you will. We were in the market for a composting toilet and a new anchor, and ended up finding so much more…

Upon checking out, the irascible older gentlemen manning the register asked what kind of boat we had.

“It’s a Pearson Ariel” I said, “kind of a smaller version of a Triton.”

“Oh I know” said the man, with perhaps a faraway glint in his eyes. “I used to own one. Great little boat. The guy who had it before me took it all the way to Bermuda.”

At this my mind took off…the guy whom we bought our Ariel from said the previous owner had taken it to Bermuda…

I asked the salesman what the hull number was, and as it turns out he owned an Ariel built in ’63, (as opposed to ’67) so not the same boat, but a similar story about a supposed offshore trip to Bermuda. I wonder if a brave soul took one of these small boats on such a trip and somehow word of his/her exploits entered into the collective unconscious of Ariel owners. “Old Peg Leg GafferMcYardarm and the Rollicking Sail to Bermuda.” Or maybe it was a useful sales pitch that somehow caught on. Or maybe these aren’t sea-stories at all, perhaps numerous folks have indeed taken an Ariel to Bermuda.

I believe that competent sailors taking these well-found little boats are capable of safely completing voyages large or small. I’d like to think that this particular little boat has been around the block a time or two, and that these past two years have been simply a pause between the adventures of the past, and the adventures yet to come. Even if it’s just out the creek and down the river…

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2 thoughts on “Bacon Sails and the Myth of the Previous Owner

  1. Pingback: Splice and Dice | The Bonnie Boat

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